Category Archives: Storage

Tips for Maximizing Your Storage Space

Most of us have stuff in storage, whether it is in a commercial storage unit or a closet in your house, we have things to store. I figure even The Minimalists have items in storage of some sort.

How do you maximize the space you have to avoid paying monthly storage fees or to minimize the storage fees you pay by renting a smaller space?

Here are a few tips for making the most out of your storage.

First: Do a little purge

Figure out your have-to-haves as opposed to your nice-to-haves. Do you really need to keep that snowboard, if you haven’t been to the snow for 10 years? Would it be easier just to rent ski equipment if you decide to take a trip to the mountains?

Doing a purge doesn’t mean you have to go through everything you’ve been storing. Take a quick look around and see if there is anything easy to get rid of. Is there a carpet that is so stained you’ll never use it again? or are you holding onto art that you’ll never hang on your walls?

It’s not very methodical, but every item you remove makes space to see and evaluate what’s you really want to keep.

Once you have done a sweep of the items you know you won’t keep, you can go through boxes individually, but for the quick and dirty method, just rearrange the space to make full use of it.

Second: Use containers for storage

Boxes are easier to stack than small loose items. Whenever possible, box and label items that can be stacked or put on shelves. Clear plastic tubs are great because you can easily see what’s inside.

Third: Maximize the use of the space

Use vertical space, add shelves, use rollers or wheels under things to make things moveable. These rolling metal shelves come in different sizes.  The shelf heights can be customized. Find them at Home Depot, Costco, The Container Store and even on Amazon.

These plastic shelves are inexpensive and easy to move around.


Fourth: Arrange the room

Packing the room according to your access needs is essential. Group items toward the front that need to be accessible…even if they aren’t exactly in the same category. For example, you might need access to your summer equipment more often than your Aunt Gertrude’s ashes (yes, we find those in storage units.) Seasonal items take priority over memorabilia.

Consider whether you need walkways to get to things or can items be put on rolling shelves and stack the shelves right next to each other – knowing you can roll them out to get to the back.

Fifth: Label

In addition to labeling any boxes and tubs it can be useful to label whole shelving units or zones within the space.

Tip: Use shelving on wheels so you can roll things out and get access to items in the back…instead of having to unpack the whole unit to get to something at the back wall.

Tip: Use as much vertical space as possible. Shelving enables that but if what you’re storing doesn’t make sense to store on shelves such as rolled carpets, framed pictures or skis, see if you can hang things on the walls or from the ceiling using brackets or hooks.

Handy items to keep in your storage unit:

  • Flashlight or headlamp
  • Labels and/or blue tape
  • Large magic markers/sharpies
  • Box cutters/scissors

What to bring with you when you go to visit your storage:

  • Storage unit keys and access code
  • Camera/phone for inventorying
  • Toolkit with battery operated drill
  • Brackets/hooks
  • Sturdy plastic bins or boxes with lids

Remember to balance the true value of your items against the ongoing cost of storage Most likely, you are paying $1200 a year to store these items in a commercial storage facility.  You might intend to have items in storage for a short time, but statistics show that we keep things in storage much longer than originally planned.

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Filed under Garage, General Organizing, Moving, organizing, Perspective, Storage, Strategies

Dedicating Space for Household Management

homeoffice

Do you find your household paperwork doesn’t have a home? Is your bedroom getting used for stashing unmanaged mail? Do you have papers and mail all over the house? Are you frustrated that your home never looks tidy? Many people use a large portion of their kitchen counter to manage notes and mail…and it spills over from there. But the kitchen counter space often doesn’t provide enough room for a tidy work space.

All these scenarios point to the importance of dedicating a space for a household management center.

Location

The ideal location for a household management center is close to where this work usually gets done. Kitchen, dining room, living room are very common areas. Look where your paper is accumulating and see if you can dedicate a bit of space to make it an “official” work area. Active projects need to be out and accessible where you will really work on them. Where does the work actually get done?

If you have a more remote home office but don’t find yourself staging the mail and active projects there, you might find paper clutter creeping into the living space. It would be appropriate to create an active work station more centrally and store overflow and permanent files in the office. For example, if you find yourself most often sitting on your couch paying bills online, can you create a space there to catch incoming bills?

The Critical Bits:

  • Active projects: to-do’s and bills to pay
  • Active reference: family schedules and phone lists
  • Basic office supplies (stamps, envelopes, paperclips, post its)
  • Dedicated containers to get the recycling and shredding out of the way and off the countertop

Nice to Have Nearby:

  • Printer – can be hidden or made wireless so it can be stored in a back room or closet
  • Main household filing system – including past years taxes and permanent records
  • Overstock office supplies
  • Kids’ art portfolios

Instead of berating yourself for being messy, embrace the idea that household management needs dedicated space. And give yourself the gift of organization.

 

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Filed under Decluttering, home organizing, homework, Kitchen, Living Room, Office, organizing, Paper, paper organizing, Perspective, Storage, Work

The Best Wedding Gift Ever

Your child is getting married or graduating or having a baby…what is the most thoughtful gift you could give them that would last a lifetime? A filing system!

Now, a filing system may sound like the most boring, uninspired gift you could possibly give someone but bear with us while we explain…

A good basic filing system is an essential part of an organized life. Despite the promises of a paperless world, we constantly see people overwhelmed and confused by piles of paper in their homes. Often the problem starts at one of these of these major life events where suddenly the amount and types of paper coming in multiplies exponentially.

For a new graduate, having a central place to manage personal records, job history, and tax documents starts to teach them about leading an adult life.

For couples getting married, having a central place where all important insurance, ownership, certificates, account & tax documents are kept minimizes stress and will help them manage a life that will become increasingly more complicated.

For new parents, having a central place to keep health records, school paperwork, parenting resources, and sports/camp info prevents the stress and inefficiency of searching the house for needed documents. Providing a dedicated box for memorabilia/artwork is a great addition to a filing system.

You can easily set up a basic system in a portable file box, small or large, using categories you create or a kit such as Freedom Filer. The box doesn’t have to be their permanent container; they may already have a filing cabinet or one may be needed once all their papers are gathered.

Basic categories include:

  • Career
  • Health
  • Insurance
  • Finances
  • Personal
  • Resources
  • Vital Documents (passport, birth certificate, marriage certificate, etc.)
  • Taxes

Give your loved ones a head start on the challenges of paper management. A gift certificate to a professional organizer to help them integrate their papers into the system and further customize would be icing on the cake!

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Filed under Decluttering, Empty Nest, Paper, paper organizing, Products, professional organizer, School, Storage, Strategies, Wedding

4 Under-Utilized Areas of the Garage

 

This week’s post is about products you can install in your garage. But remember, the first step is to decide what you are keeping. You won’t know what storage you will need until you have made some decisions.  Start with a big sort and purge.

Thank you to guest writer Kenady Ghent from Monkey Bar Storage for her ideas and inspiration!

Is there ever enough space in the garage? Garages are the repositories for tools, sporting equipment, bikes, gas cans, lawn mowers, christmas decor and miscellaneous clutter. How are we expected to park our vehicles in there? If you never have a sufficient amount of space it could be because you aren’t utilizing valuable areas of the garage. Check out this list of the garage’s 4 most underutilized storage spaces.

Ceiling: Homeowners often overlook the ceiling as available storage space.  Overhead storage racks are perfect for storing rarely-used and seasonal items. Items are overhead and out of the way while relatively easy to access when you need them. Not to worry, these shelves have a 750 lb weight capacity, so your family and car are safe underneath.

Garage-Ceiling-Storage

Walls: Get your things off the floor and hung neatly on the wall. Products like garage cabinets and  shelving store your belongings in ⅓ of the space they used to take up. If your space is small and limited install shelving over doors and windows.

Garage Upper Shelves

Garage Wall Cabinets

Storage Products: Even your storage products can be optimized. Purchase garage shelving that has layering capabilities, that way you can store 3x more on the same shelving unit. You can even add accessories like bike hooks and sports ball bags to shelving for those items that are more difficult to store efficiently. Also, adding drawers inside garage cabinets can maximize that storage space.

Garage Wall Rack

Adjacent to the Door: The open space next to the door that leads into the house is perfect for a mini mudroom. Creating this command center prevents clutter like shoes, backpacks, jackets and keys from entering your home. Just add hooks, a shoe rack and a trashcan for wrappers and loose paper.

Garage Mud Room

Are you taking advantage of these underutilized spaces in the garage? After you’ve maximized your space, you’ll have room for the items you’ve been keeping in that storage unit and can get rid of the monthly storage unit bill. There is money in your unused garage space! With the money you save you can invest in a  garage flooring alternative that is both functional and beautiful.

For questions about garage organization solutions, visit: http://garagestoragesanfrancisco.com/.

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Filed under Bay Area Services, Decluttering, Garage, Guest Experts, home organizing, Products, Reduce/Recyle/Reuse, Storage

The Ultimate Way to Organize Your Fridge

Fridge organized

This post was excerpted from an article written by Maria Janowiak and repurposed with permission from Greatist.

Tip: Your fridge isn’t just a closet for food—it’s a high-tech device that helps you store all of your favorite snacks, condiments, and meal-fixins in optimal conditions. Not only do refrigerators have different compartments that serve different purposes, they also have different temperature zones.

Freezer

You can store a surprising number of other foods in the freezer for later use, such as tortillas, pasta sauce, and even eggs. (Note: You can freeze bread for up to three months, but don’t store it in the fridge or it’ll dry out.) The trick with freezers is to pack foods tightly in their containers and keep things well organized, since this optimizes storage and also saves energy. Freeze foods in stackable plastic containers or in plastic freezer bags laid flat.

Doors

Doors are the warmest part of the fridge and should be reserved for foods that are most resistant to spoiling. Keep condiments, juices, and other foods that can stand up to temperature fluctuations here.

Upper Shelves

One pro strategy from restaurant kitchens is to place foods that don’t need to be cooked near the top of the fridge. This includes leftovers, drinks, and ready-to-eat foods like tortillas, hummus, and deli meats.

Lower Shelves

Because cold air is heavier the lower shelves are your best bet for raw meat, eggs, seafood, and other dairy to be stored at the coldest temperatures. To prevent raw meat’s bacteria from spreading to other areas, assign a particular section of the fridge as your meat locker.

Overall: Don’t crowd your shelves too much. Unlike the freezer, the fridge shouldn’t be totally packed. Cold air needs to flow here, and if it can’t, you’ll get inconsistent temps with pockets of heat and warmth.

Crisper Drawers

The purpose of crisper drawers is to maintain moist conditions that help preserve fruits and vegetables. But don’t make the mistake of jumbling all your produce together in a fruit and veg free-for-all. Many fruits, including apples, peaches, plums, pears, and cantaloupes, produce ethylene, a chemical that helps them to ripen. Unfortunately the ethylene produced can also promote ripening in other plants, causing vegetables to go yellow, limp, or even sprout. For this reason, keep veggies in one drawer and fruits in another.

On Top of the Fridge

If you’ve been using the top of your fridge like a food attic, stacking bottles of Merlot or loaves of bread up there, stop. (Heat rises from the fridge’s condenser.) Result: It gets pretty warm up top. Heat is Kryptonite to wine. And it’ll make bread mold faster. The best use of this space? Store appliances or supplies like paper towels or a stack of cookbooks.

To Fridge or Not to Fridge?

One of the tougher questions is figuring out if something goes in the fridge in the first place. Certain foods don’t belong in the fridge. Tomatoes will turn mealy and odorless in the fridge—keep them comfy at room temperature. Onions, squash, and potatoes do best in a cooler environment with low moisture, so store them in a dark cupboard or other place outside of the fridge. Avocados and many fruits are just fine being left on the counter to ripen, but also can go in the fridge to slow the process down if needed. Herbs can be kept in the fridge or in a vase on the countertop if they’ll be used with a few days.

With a fridge organized for maximal accessibility and food freshness, you’ll be inspired to reach in for ingredients to make healthy meals.

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Filed under Decluttering, Guest Experts, home organizing, Kitchen, Storage

5 Tips for Designing an IKEA Armoire

Here's one kind of "closet" that can be made using the PAX system from IKEA.

Here’s one kind of “closet” that can be made using the PAX system from IKEA. The final product had sliding glass doors. In 2016, this unit cost about $1,700

An armoire is a free-standing closet. If you have minimal closet space or just need more closed storage, an armoire can be a lifesaver. IKEA’s PAX product line is one of the most customizable; it allows you to design the exact kind of storage that you need. Here are 5 useful tips for designing an IKEA PAX armoire:

TIP: Before starting to plan, take an accurate inventory of your clothes. How much hanging space do you need? Are most of your clothes short-hanging (less than 40”) or do you have long robes, gowns or slacks hanging with clips? What kind of folded clothes do you have? Socks, underwear, jammies? Are you going to store shoes in the system or not? At this point you don’t need to know HOW you’re storing everything but you need to know exactly WHAT you’re trying to store.

TIP: Be mindful of prime real estate. When designing your system, know that the prime area of storage is the zone from forehead to hip height. Plan to stow most-used items in this zone.

TIP: You can design the closet yourself using the online planning tool. This tool enables you to drag and drop all the components and features. Is it user friendly? Hmm…you have to be fairly computer-savvy to use it. You can also get help from an IKEA staff person in the store. Some of the staff actually have knowledge of how to build your system.

TIP: These are modular units, but the very first decision you make is what kind of doors you want to use; sliding doors or doors that open out. This is because the basic frame is different for these different door styles. Also, you need to choose the best height for your PAX system. It comes in 2 different heights. Generally, you want to maximize your vertical storage (the taller option) if your room can accommodate it.

TIP: You can save money by going full DIY including pulling all the pieces from the warehouse and assembling yourself (2 people required) or you can get IKEA to help as much as you want. With your design, the IKEA staff can gather the components, deliver it to your house and install it.

* Note: If you are going to purchase their installation, it is important to know that you are responsible for removing the baseboards in the area you want the armoire installed so the IKEA installers can attach it to the wall.

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Filed under Bedroom, children, Closets, Decluttering, General Organizing, Living Room, organizing, Products, Storage

10 Easy Steps To Tame Closet Clutter

Hanger uniformity creates visual clarity

Do you look in the closet and feel like you can’t actually see anything you want to wear? Closets are a place neatness matters. One of the keys to stress-free dressing is having your clothes easily visible.

Here are 10 tips to reduce the chaos and make your clothing choices jump out at you in the morning.

  1. Standardize your hangers. Using the same kind of hanger provides visual peace and continuity. It eliminates information you’re brain is having to process so it can focus on the clothes. And have all clothes facing in the same direction.
Mixed hanger types create visual clutter

Mixed hanger types create visual clutter

  1. Sort your clothes by sleeve length first, then color. When we’re choosing clothes to wear, usually we’re thinking first what would be appropriate for the weather, and then we look for color or style.
  1. Use closet rod dividers to separate types of clothes. These provide a visual clue where to start looking and keep clothes in their groupings when you’re putting things away.
  1. Remove excess hangers and dry-cleaning bags. They obscure what you have and catch on other stuff.
  1. Locate areas of wasted space. Is there room to add a second, lower bar? Is there wall space that could accommodate hooks for belts, scarves, handbags or even necklaces?
  1. Don’t stack folded items more than 4 or 5 items high. If the stacks are too tall, they are bound to topple and create mess.
  1. When stacking folded items, make the round, folded edge face outward. This creates a cleaner pile and is easier to assess what you have.
  1. Respect the fact that your closet is prime real estate. Don’t use it as a dumping ground for things that belong elsewhere.
  1. Weed regularly. Keep a donation bag handy to drop things into when you realize you’re not going to wear them again
  1. If possible, get shoes off the floor. At a minimum, use a shoe rack and get them up where you can see them. If shoes are stored under your clothes, they are hard to see. Consider using the back of your closet door to hang a shoe compartment bag. Some people even keep shoes in a rolling container under the bed.

Try even 2 or 3 of these tips to experience the relief an orderly closet can provide on a daily basis. Do you have a simple trick you use to keep your closet neat? Share it with us!

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Filed under Bedroom, Closets, Decluttering, disorganization, home organizing, organizing, Storage