Tag Archives: liquidation

The 5 Types of Items Worth Holding Onto

Items-That-Will-Be-Worth-More-in-the-Future-750x485

This week we share a post by Brian Graves from Everything But The House (EBTH). This post first appeared on NextAvenue. 

Determining which collectibles have the potential to increase in value has changed drastically over the past 20 years. With the introduction of e-commerce, items once believed to be rare were made available en masse. And with previous generations of collectors in a position to divest their prized possessions, the forces of supply and demand may have never had a more profound impact on collecting.

For centuries, there were cyclical styles of items that could be acquired when they were out of favor with the knowledge that eventually they’d come back in vogue. It’s why you hear some furniture styles described with the term “revival” after their name (there was the original period and then the period where they were revived).

So, what makes something popular and worth holding onto? Well, as the founder and Chief Learning Officer of the estate sale company and auction platform, Everything But The House (EBTH), I’d say it’s the herd mentality. When I started collecting in the 1990s, the predominant design themes in the average American home included Southwestern patterns in pastel tones (mauve, teal, peach) and traditional furnishings with Grecian patterned upholstery in burgundy, gold, and hunter green. At the time, Midcentury Modern furnishings were only starting to regain a following. I recall pulling a pair of DUX Midcentury Modern chairs out of the garbage and proudly sold the pair at a show the following weekend for $150. If I had known then what I know now, I might have held out for more.

My point is that by the time you know something is in demand, it’s often too late. Therefore, in order to know what might be worth holding onto, you have to be able to do something most of us can’t: see into the future. Still, there are five keys to knowing which possessions offer promise:

1. Items that are either one-of-a-kind, handmade by a skilled artist or craftsperson or made in limited quantities will always be in demand. For instance, curating an art collection of living artists can be a good investment strategy. But not always. So pair this rule with the following three points: 1) Buy the art to enjoy it. 2.) Don’t invest more than you’re comfortable losing. 3.) Diversify.

2. Items made of high-quality materials by notable firms will always have an audience. Names like Hermès, Chanel, Tiffany and Cartier get collectors to pay closer attention. They’re like buying blue-chip stocks. These firms have stood the test of time and shown they have what it takes to maintain consumer interest, even if that means reinventing themselves. The items won’t necessarily appreciate in value, but they are much less likely to depreciate if kept in good condition.

3. Other collectibles to consider are ones that remind us of our youth. Once a generation reaches middle age with disposable income (usually older than 35), they tend to collect objects that remind them of their yesteryears. This transcends categories and applies to toys, books and even vehicles. For instance, in recent years, He-Man action figures from the 1980s have appreciated to values exceeding even earlier generations of toys such as G.I. Joe figures from the 1960s.

But the timing on the sale of these types of objects is critical. A rule of thumb: consider selling nostalgia items 25 to 35 years after they originally became popular. It’s important to note that the earliest editions —produced in limited quantities before the category became popular enough to justify increased production — command the highest prices.

4. Consider holding onto items connected to unique events or people in history but that were intended to be discarded. These are often referred to as ephemera. The key here is that the item must be one-of-a-kind or hard to come by.

For example, many people held onto newspapers reporting the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the moon landing, so they’re not rare and therefore not valuable. But if you held onto an early promotional poster for The Rolling Stones from the same timeframe, you would have more than enough to pay for a nice vacation after selling it.

5. Another category to consider: objects that have a tangible value based on what they’re made of. Precious metals such as silver, gold, and platinum all have an associated market value, which is readily identifiable and allows for immediate liquidity. Antique or high-quality examples of these objects can often have values worth two to 10 times the value of the precious metal itself or even more. But profiting from less desirable, and more common, examples — such as bullion coins or damaged serving pieces — depends on the current price of the metal. Silver, for instance, is currently worth about 1/3 what it was in 2011, but that’s still about three times as much as in 2001.

So what would I recommend keeping that might be worth more money down the road? Well, nothing really. You should only hold onto something if you love it, use it and have a place in your home for it. Be careful not to become too hung up on hanging onto collectibles in the hopes they might go up in value, especially if you don’t have the space for them. Most collectibles fall out of favor in time. My advice: be cautious about holding onto items which create clutter and cost money to store and care for, coupled with no guarantees.

If you want to get a glimpse into which types of objects people are most interested in collecting today, click here to see the most followed objects at my company’s site, EBTH.com.

by Brian Graves July 20, 2017

Brian Graves is founder and chief learning officer at Everything But The House (EBTH), where he uses his extensive knowledge of history, antique valuation and authentication to help maximize value for clients. A longtime collector and a graduate of the Mendenhall School of Auctioneering, Brian founded EBTH in 2008 with Jacquie Denny, after years spent buying, refurbishing and reselling antiques in his spare time.

EVERYTHING BUT THE HOUSE (EBTH) is the only online estate sale company that combines high-touch customer service with the reach of an e-commerce site. Their full service model— photography, cataloging, payment and delivery – makes the entire process of planning and managing an estate sale easy and seamless.

 

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Filed under artwork, Decluttering, downsizing, Garage, Guest Experts, Moving, Perspective

Ways to Get Things Out of (and Into) Your House

Are you downsizing or relocating? Or just have some stuff you want removed from your house? Every now and then need a couple of strong guys to deliver furniture or take away a big load of donations?

These 3 options provide ways to jettison the stuff you don’t want.

remoov

Remoov

Remoov is a company that takes everything away and sells or donates, recycles and trashes items you don’t need. They literally “remove” everything, sell what they can and give you the difference between the cost of the moving and processing and 50% of the proceeds from the sales of items. They curate to get the best price for the items. They sell items through their online auction site: TheLocalFlea.com.

  • 50% of the value of the sold items
  • Donation receipt for your taxes
  • Your junk responsibly discarded
  • A new home for your unwanted items

They are committed to reducing waste by increasing recycling and reuse of products. The timeframe for the removal of items can be quite short.  Getting money back from items sold can take many weeks.  Pricing is easy to figure with their online graphic.

MaxSold (1)

MaxSold

Having an estate sale is a one traditional way of clearing a home. MaxSold is an ONLINE only version of an estate sale.

What do you have to do to prepare? Separate items you want to keep from those you want to sell. Items for sell will be grouped into “lots”, photographed, put into an online catalog and marketed locally. Viewers of the auction have 1 week to bid on items. Pickups are scheduled for 1 day in particular time slots and managed by MaxSold staff. Purchasers must show ID and proof of purchase before being escorted to pickup their “lots.”

The whole process takes 2 weeks end to end. Max Sold charges 30% or $10 per lot OR $1000 overall whichever is higher. MaxSold does not handle donation or disposal of items that don’t sell.

lugg

Lugg

Think of this as Uber for movers. On-demand or by schedule you can get 2 guys to load, haul, deliver or move things within a home. A simple to use phone app lets you set your pickup location, add a photo of items to be handled, get an instant quote, and movers can be on their way within 30 minutes. You can also schedule a date & time in the future if needed. Currently only available in SF Bay Area (all counties) and Los Angeles. Drop-off point can be up to 150 miles from pickup.

Examples of when to use:

  • Bringing home furniture from IKEA or another store
  • Taking away boxes of books for donation
  • Taking away a load of junk to the dump
  • Moving furniture between rooms of the house
  • Pickup a craigslist purchase and deliver to your house

These are only 3 of many different ways to declutter and downsize. When you’re ready, help is available!

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Filed under Bay Area Services, Decluttering, Empty Nest, Garage, Moving, Reduce/Recyle/Reuse, Strategies

6 Ways to Clear Out Your House or Storage Unit

What are your options if you want to empty your house?

What are your options if you want to empty your house?

We often work with clients faced with needing to empty out an entire house or storage unit. The reason may be due to downsizing, inheriting an estate, or over-accumulation. It can be daunting to know how to get the space emptied most efficiently and cost-effectively. Some of our clients are so exasperated they can only think of drastic options like leaving their doors open for burglars or lighting a match.

Here are 6 options you can use in combination:

Estate sale

Estate professionals will come to your house for free and assess whether or not an estate sale is appropriate for your stuff. Typically they are looking to see if there is enough value that they’ll make a profit on the project.

You don’t necessarily need to have antiques or unusual items. Many estate sales are made up of everyday items.

If appropriate, they would advertise and organize the entire sale either from your property or elsewhere. You would need to extract anything you want to keep prior to the sale. You receive a percentage of the sale. Some companies require that they have to receive a minimum dollar amount and you only receive a percentage of profits above that minimum.

Buy-out

If your stuff isn’t going to bring in enough value to make a full estate sale viable, estate professionals may instead offer to do a buy-out. Basically they offer you a flat amount for everything in the house. They handle removal of everything including furniture and donations/garbage/recycling. Typically hauling/dump fees are charged separately or taken out of the offer.

Auction house

You can sell items through an auction house. Most auction houses offer free weekly appraisal events where you can bring in items or pictures. They also have specialists who can come to you and assess your items. We know of one local auction house that sell everyday items (provided there’s enough to meet a minimum value) but most focus on selling particularly valuable items.

Charity pick up

There are dozens of agencies with trucks willing to come to your house to take away re-useable furniture, household items, and clothing. Typically they are pretty selective because the items need to be in a condition to re-sell.

Junk hauler

The last resort for clearing out a space is a hauler. They charge by the job, not the hour. Many haulers are environmentally sensitive and will separate a load into recyclables, donations and true garbage. Unless they are certified to do so, they are not legally allowed to take away household hazardous waste such as old paint, etc.

Furniture Consignment

This won’t handle the issue of clearing a whole house but often the furniture is the most difficult to deal with. Consignment stores offer a way to sell furniture and get a percentage of the sale price. They will be selective, as certain styles of furniture just won’t sell. Most require you to bring the furniture to them or pay to have it moved there.

We are very well connected in the SF Bay Area; if you need recommendations for vendors of any of these services, just ask!

 

 

 

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Filed under Decluttering, Empty Nest, General Organizing, Reduce/Recyle/Reuse, Strategies