Tag Archives: recycle

Repurpose That Wedding Dress

 

large gown - 1

Wedding dresses can take on almost mythic significance both before AND after the wedding. Once the wedding bells have finished ringing and the party is over the wedding dress remains as one of the largest, most awkward pieces of memorabilia to deal with.

The pull of emotions and nostalgia are understandably very strong and it can make deciding what to do with your gown a challenge. A few years down the road you may be ready to reclaim the space the giant archive box is using in a closet.

A quick Internet search turns up lots of creative alternative ideas of what you can do with your gown:

  • Create a keepsake from the fabric – a nice clutch purse, a framed section of lace, a holiday ornament, a jewelry locket, a teddy bear…Pinterest is a great source to inspire you creatively to save an essence of the dress.
  • Repurpose the dress into something you can wear again. Have it altered and/or dyed to create a fancy party dress you can enjoy over and over. Have some custom lingerie made!
  • Share the wealth! Donate your gown to a charity. Brides Across America provides free wedding dresses to military and first responder brides who couldn’t otherwise afford one. Another option is Brides Against Breast Cancer, who use the proceeds from donated gown sales to help cancer patients. The Goodwill is also a fine place to make your gown available to someone in need.
  • Recoup some of the cost of the gown to celebrate a special anniversary. There are several sites specializing in selling pre-owned quality gowns. The Knot reviews their top picks here including options to rent gowns.

You might want to ritualize the departure of your wedding dress to get a sense of gratitude and closure. Reminisce a bit about the event, honor the role the dress played in making your wedding special and then feel free to transition it to a different existence – either in a different form in your life or intact to enrich someone else’s.

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Filed under Decluttering, General Organizing, Memorabilia, Reduce/Recyle/Reuse, Wedding

Perspectives on Letting Go

freedom release letting go

Ahh, attachments to our stuff. It’s really all a mental game. If we were truly able to assess our belongings according to our practical needs, we would probably be living with 10% of what we own.

Why is letting go so hard? How do we manage the psychology of releasing things?

Over the years, we’ve seen people find success with one (or a combination) of these three approaches:

Focus on how you can help yourself

Honor the life you want to live. Have a vision of how you want to be in the world and edit your stuff so you can match that and live your best life now. This is about releasing the past and creating your ideal future. You’re honoring yourself by letting that be your focus.

Focus on how you can help other people

Recognize that your excess is a form of abundance. Release your objects so they can serve their purpose in other people’s lives. Release resentment or other negative emotions that the objects bring up in you and put them out into the world to do positive things for other people.

Feng Shui expert Karen Kingston tells a story of a divorced woman had a pair of large, expensive decorative urns from her divorce settlement. They were beautiful but made her think, with bitterness, of her ex-husband.  She was encouraged to sell them and get a lot of money for them instead of having them foster bitterness and resentment and a constant reminder of a painful relationship.

Focus on how you can help the environment

Bringing in less can aid the environment, but disposing of things in a thoughtful way will help offset the environmental impact of consumption. Some people hesitate to clean out a closet or garage because they don’t want it all to go to landfill. Take advantage of living in the San Francisco Bay Area which is filled with easy options for recycling/reuse and responsible disposal.

Stopwaste.org is a quick way to find what is available near you. There are many places that accept e-waste, expired medicines, CFLs, hazardous waste, styrofoam, packing peanuts and air-packs. Partially used art and office supplies can go to the East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse or S.C.R.A.P., building materials and hardware can go to Urban Ore or a Habitat for Humanity ReStore outlet. Plastic children’s toys, if not donate-able, can be recycled with hard plastic at most urban recycling centers. There are also resources for your unneeded medical equipment (wheelchairs, walkers, tubing, etc.)

Freecycle, Craigslist, Nextdoor, and other community neighborhood forums are great places to post usable items for free.  These places allow you to find people who want your cast-offs and will take care of the hauling!

If you don’t want to deal with the public, you can pay for a hauler to come. EcoHaul, 1-800-Got Junk, Lugg are companies that advertise responsible disposal of items the remove from your place.

There is no “right” approach. What is that key that will release you from the obligation to hold on to things you don’t need and really don’t even want? Not sure how to get rid of something? Just ask! As Professional Organizers, we’ve got ideas!

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Filed under Decluttering, organizing, Perspective, Reduce/Recyle/Reuse, Strategies

Dump Your Junk (And Help The Environment!)

Trash made into treasures

Trash made into treasures

Unless we know where some of our unwanted possessions can go and be appreciated, it’s challenging to envision a space without them. This week we want to highlight a local gem for helping people shed their excess.

The East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse offers sanctuary and new hope for household items, office and art supplies, and raw craft materials we no longer need. Finding creative places for the things we don’t need is a challenge for everyone…you want your castoffs to be loved and appreciated!  The Depot and other solid waste diverters rest squarely at the crossroads of ecology, art and education.

Typical things you’ll find at the Depot:

  • sewing notions
  • frames and canvases
  • hundreds of images from posters, magazines, calendars, and postcards
  • unique containers such as tins
  • cardboard tubes, corks, plastic lids
  • everyday household items
  • kids games and books
  • CDs and movies
  • books!
  • jewelry and beads
  • envelopes, staples, small office supplies, paper, pens, markers

For a complete list of items they do and do not accept, see their website. All your donations are tax deductible.

It was originally created by and for teachers but now is a resource for artists, and regular folks too. Teachers are special there – they offer many free items to teachers.

The Depot donates a large portion of the reusable items that are collected to more than 20 local charitable organizations in Contra Costa County and beyond.

There are other similar businesses in the SF Bay Area such as SCRAP in San Francisco and RAFT in San Jose

We’re all in favor of doing a big clear-out, but resist the urge to dump everything in the garbage.  Part of the responsibility of owning something is disposing of it consciously.

Can your cast-offs have a new life with your local teachers or artists?

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Filed under Decluttering, Perspective, Reduce/Recyle/Reuse